H100 Latina Giving Circle

New policies such as the Affordable Care Act, or ACA, and other proposed policies such as immigration reform can greatly improve the lives of Latina women and their families. For example, under the ACA, around 4.9 million Latinas are receiving expanded preventive service coverage, and an estimated 4.6 million Latinas will gain access to affordable or subsidized health insurance, which may help close some of the health disparities Latina women face. In 2017, #LatinaGeeks designed the “Latinas Learn to Code” program to help bridge the gender gap in the tech programming industry by providing an introduction to the foundations of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript — the three building blocks of the web. The workshops have expanded to additional technical skills workshops like cloud computing, digital marketing, data analytics and more. In the last two years they have successfully built strong partnerships with tech companies like Microsoft, Intuit, Eset and others to encourage technology adoption within the community and increase the number of Latinas in technology-related careers.

We used community-based participatory research approaches to engage members of the ethnically diverse Latina community at all stages of the research. They participated in conceptualizing the study aims, adapting the HIV intervention materials, and developing assessment measures and recruitment strategies. The outreach workers were involved http://pembrokeshirestorage.net/2020/06/23/elsalvador-girls-during-history/ in identifying and selecting recruitment sites, conceptualizing recruitment strategies, developing culturally appropriate and appealing recruitment materials , and disseminating recruitment materials. A pay disparity persists even when data is controlled for occupation, geography and education level, she told the audience.

Women workers are only 7.3 percent of those in registered apprenticeships.33 Of women who are in apprenticeship programs, less than 10 percent are Hispanic, compared to men in apprenticeships, almost 16 percent of whom identified as Hispanic. Furthermore, women earn less in their apprenticeship programs than men do. Hispanic women earn the least in apprenticeship programs compared to all other groups by racial, ethnic, and gender breakdown.

The first study17 found a 24% greater risk of low birth weight among children born to Latina mothers after a federal immigration raid compared with births the year before the raid; no such change appeared among births to non-Latina women. The second study18 found that prenatal exposure to the passage of a restrictive immigration law in Arizona coincided with lower birth weight among children born to Latina immigrant women but not among children born to US-born white, black, or Latina women. Furthermore, women pursuing college degrees are on average older than their male counterparts, and tend to go into lower-paying career fields at disproportionate rates. Women also hold an unequal share of the nation’s outstanding student-loan debt — two-thirds of the pie, according to the American Association of University Women — despite the fact that fewer women have college degrees. While women are attending college at a higher rate than men (56 percent of four-year-college enrollees were women in 2017), enrollment figures don’t match their share of student loan debt.

Moreover, these statistics apply to Hispanics that have not recently migrated to the United States, implying that the American education system is not meeting the needs of Latino students as a population. The Institute for Women’s Policy Research shows in a study in 2008, that Latina immigrants residing in Phoenix, Northern Virginia, and Atlanta all have a lower high school completion rates when compared to their male Latino immigrant counterparts. Latinas also fall behind Latino immigrants in their likelihood to attend 1–4 years of college.

The Affordable Care Act does not cover non-citizens nor does it cover immigrants with less than 5 years of residency. As a result, Latino immigrants struggle to gain health care once they enter the United States. Non-citizen Latinos often avoid hospitals and clinics for fear of deportation, leading to an increased risk of preventable diseases such as tuberculosis and Hepatitis in this population. Additionally, Latino health deteriorates as this population assimilates into unhealthy lifestyles associated with lower socioeconomic American populations.

Because individual and group education sessions achieved a similar level of patient satisfaction, Spalluto believes large-group education sessions during mammography screenings in this population may represent an opportunity to consolidate time and resources. Participants with access to the promotora had the opportunity to ask questions during both the education sessions and clinical services.

Just three sectors – leisure and hospitality, education and health services, and retail trade – accounted for 59% of the total loss in nonfarm jobs from February to May. These sectors also accounted for 47% of jobs held by women in February, compared with 28% for men, exposing women to a higher risk of unemployment in recent months.

  • This can leave them open to discrimination and bias, which can be especially harmful for women of color.
  • While the federal minimum wage acts as an equalizer between genders, women of color are over-represented among low-wage earner.
  • In Los Angeles, LIFT serves mostly Latino families, 50 percent of whom do not have a legal right to work and nearly 50 percent of whom are monolingual-Spanish-speaking.
  • While they account for 17 percent of the total workforce, they make up 33 percent of workers in fast-growing, low-wage jobs like those in fast food, retail, and home health aid work.
  • About half of the LIFT families in New York City are English-language learners.

Bureau of Labor Statistics, 32.2 percent of Latina women work in the service sector, compared with only 20 percent of white women, and service workers are almost 20 percent less likely to have either paid sick leave or retirement benefits. Latina-owned businesses are concentrated in the industries of health care at 20 percent, administrative services at 18 percent, retail at 10 percent, professional at 9 percent, and real estate at 6 percent. Much of these differences are grounded in the presence of occupational segregation.

Importantly, both models confirm the empirical evidence presented by Paul, Zaw, Hamilton, and Darity of the role of intersectionality in the labor market. Specifically, Hispanic women’s total wage gap (40 percent, as calculated with Paul et al.’s specification) is larger than the addition of their gender wage gap with Hispanic men and their ethnic wage gap with white women . Researchers analyzed 1,293 women who gave birth between April and June at Pennsylvania Hospital and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, which combined represent 50 percent of live births during that time in Philadelphia.

Fact Sheet: The State Of Latinas In The United States

Additionally, the Latina population is increasingly becoming «primary wage earners and influencers» in the modern Hispanic United States Household. Latinx cultural values can trigger mental health issues in the lives of Latinx women and cause them to underutilize mental health services as compared to the general population. About one in four Latina teenagers have thought about committing suicide, a rate higher than Latino teenage counterparts, according to Salud America! 6 These rates are not only due to racial and gender discrimination, but are also a result of Latinx cultural values such familisimo and marianismo7. Familisimo, although it emphasizes a strong family unit, can inhibit Latina teenagers from embracing their own unique independent identity8.

Another theory is that women are choosing to forgo careers in STEM to attain better work-family balance—rather than being pushed out by bias. Several new studies add to the growing body of evidence that documents the role of gender bias in driving women out of science careers. A 2014 study found that both men and women were twice as likely to hire a man for a job that required math. In our analysis of all US births from 2009 to 2017, we found a significant upward level shift in the number of preterm births among US Latina women that coincided with the 2016 US presidential election. This result appeared most pronounced for infants conceived or in their second trimester of gestation near the time of the election.

The Hispanic paradox refers to the medical research indicating that Latino immigrants enter the United States with better health, on average, than the average American citizen, but lose this health benefit the longer they reside in the United States. It is important to note that this health paradox affects both male and female populations of Latinos. Likewise, immigrant Latina women are found to have a lower infant mortality rate than U.S. born women. This has been explained by the tendency for Hispanic women to continue breastfeeding for a longer amount of time. The 1970s marked the first decade in which a gender shift occurred in Mexican migration.

Mass Incarceration And The Prison Industrial Complex Only Affect Latino Men

Closing the Latina women’s pay gap, Ms. Thomas added, would result in an additional $1 million in earnings over the course of a Latina woman’s career. “The impact it has on spending power for Latinas and their families is tremendous,” she said. That gap is greater than for black women, who earn 39% less than white men, according to an analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data, and greater than for Native American women, who earn 42% less than white men. None of these policy interventions is a silver bullet on its own, but together they would support greater economic opportunity for Latina workers and all other workers.

 
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